Combichrist (At Oriental Theater)

Anchors Aweigh Presents

Combichrist (At Oriental Theater)

Wednesday 13, Night Club, Prison, Death Valley High, Hydraform

Sat 5/26/18

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm (event ends at 11:59 pm)

$24-$150

This event is all ages

Combichrist
Combichrist
Combichrist was originally a side-project by Andy LaPlegua of the popular futurepop band Icon Of Coil and formerly of hardcore metal band Lash Out. However, since the disbandment of Icon Of Coil, Combichrist has become Andy's main focus. Combichrist has had much more success than many of the other acts emerging from the electronic underground and the band has become one of the dark electro scene's most popular live acts.

Originally (and, in the studio, still) a solo project, live performances began featuring Andy on vocals while someone else controlled the synths/laptop/etc. In 2005 or early 2006, the live line-up was expanded to incorporate live drums and live keys. As Combichrist's albums evolved from noise and techno into industrial and metal, the live line-up changed too and they became more of a band than a project. Initially, a guitarist was added (Abbey Nex, of Genitorturers, Psyclon 9, later Abbey Death), and then a bassist too. Combichrist have played live as a solo act, a duo, a trio, a four-, five- and six-piece live band, and once with a full orchestra behind them. The 2012 "Evolution" tour charted this musical progression, with band members taking to the stage one by one as each track demanded it, mimicking the history of Combichrist.

Although ostensibly now a full band, Andy does occasionally play "Old-School Electro Shows" focused on early Combichrist tracks. These are often him accompanied by one guest musician, as in the early shows - Joe Letz, Mr Petersen, Elliott Berlin, and Daniel Graves have all joined him on keys at various times. In April 2016 he played a very rare solo Combichrist show in LA, which was recorded and released as a bonus disc alongside This Is Where Death Begins.

Regularly featuring a drummer and a percussionist (at opposite sides of the stage, who will repeatedly throw sticks and even drums at each other), Combichrist's shows are energetic and lively, their members being showmen as well as talented musicians, with plenty of onstage interplay meaning you can watch any one of them and be entertained. Despite the live act (and official albums) crossing into hardcore metal and industrial, Andy has released a lot of bonus discs (mostly one per album) that still focus primarily on techno, house, and electro, mainly without vocals.

The roster of live members is currently Joe Letz (ex Genitorturers, ex Amen), Eric13 (Sex Slaves), Brent Ashley, Nick Rossi (New Year's Day). Past live members include Z_Marr (ex Hell Trash, now of ) and Trevor Friedrich who was the drummer for Eighteen Visions and Imperative Reaction, Kourtney Klein (who also played drums for the reformed Nitzer Ebb), Syn M, Shaun Frandsen (Glis), Mr Petersen & Jon H.
Wednesday 13
Wednesday 13
American musician, born 12 August 1976 in Landis, North Carolina, USA.
Night Club
Night Club
East Los Angeles, CA
Death Valley High
Death Valley High
Fuse distorted guitar riffs over dance-punk beats and you'll have Death Valley High - the mixtape to a doomsday dance party. The band have spent the last 2 years touring in the US and Europe. 2016 will find them touring the US again with Orgy, then hitting the studio to record their fourth full length album. PØSITIVE EUTH out now! Available on CD, MP3, & Limited Edition 12"LP.
"Tapped into a raw energy and honed it into a sweetly sinister sound."
Hydraform
Hydraform
When Hydraform recorded and released its first single “Thrive” in 2014 it seemed like a symbol for the band’s drive and durability. Within a year of forming the Denver-based band made a music video for “Thrive” and carved its own niche in the hard rock and metal world of the Mile High City. While there are clear roots in the type of heavier music exemplified by Deftones and System of a Down, Hydraform has taken the groove-and-melody-oriented songwriting approach to give the aggressive energy of the music an immediate accessibility that eludes many harder edged bands.

The four-piece originated when guitarist Jacob Streifer moved to Denver from San Diego to attend college and there he met drummer Tyler Toth his senior year of college and the two jammed in Steifer’s basement in a seedy part of town. These sessions found the two musicians hanging out at a nearby bar and music venue called Lost Lake and it was there that a chance conversation brought in their singer Carter Pashko who was then playing drums for a band and not enjoying the experience. Steifer mentioned he needed a metal singer. Carter mentioned that he was a metal singer to a skeptical Streifer.

“He screamed while an indie band player in the other room quietly,” recalls Steifer. He yelled two verses of Lamb of God epically perfect. The whole bar was looking at me and at Carter screaming and I was like, ‘Okay, we’re practicing on Wednesday, see you there.’”

From there the band auditioned bassist John Jarvinen and formed a band that satisfied a mutual love of metal and hard rock while incorporating the diverse musical interests and abilities of its members. Jarvinen had learned some jazz chops from going to summer programs at the Berklee School of Music. Streifer grew up playing around in pop punk bands until one-day hearing walking by his high school’s ceramics lab and hearing System of a Down’s Toxicity blasting from within. Steifer subsequently went down the heavy music rabbit hole and learned his guitar chops teaching himself to play As I Lay Dying’s Frail Words Collapse album.

With the 2016 release of Dark Adder, a play on “dark matter,” proved that it has grown beyond its grounding in metalcore or progressive metal. Recorded at The Aresnal Studios with Dan Barnhart, the subject matter of songs on Dark Adder tackle issues of personal growth in songs like “Chasing My Shadow” and “Thrive” which challenge the singer and the listener to persevere through troubled times and to not be afraid to question self-destructive thinking.

Hyrdraform has since been developing the material for its next album due out in late 2017. That the band hasn’t pigeonholed itself by trying to fit in with any local or national music trends, its break to wider audiences seems inevitable.
Venue Information:
The Oriental Theater
4335 W 44th Ave
Denver, CO, 80212
http://www.theorientaltheater.com